Courses

Students participate in studio experiences and seminars that deal with the analysis of problems in perception, conception, and imagination through a variety of disciplines. The studio work encompasses both two- and three-dimensional forms in their optical, technical and symbolic natures. Students may deal with specifically designed structural problems or examine these problems from expressive, social and historical perspectives.

FAU 231
Seminar: Ideation and Conceptualization for Jewelers
3 credits
This course will broaden the student's awareness of the object-based world while developing conceptual skills through exercises in observation, writing, collection and presentation. Students will use drawing and rendering as a generative source and critical thinking tool in the design process and to facilitate discussion.

FAU 241
Fine Arts Seminar I
3 credits
The Fine Arts Seminars explore ideas and issues relevant to the Fine Arts curriculum. They address concerns of the studio arising from the social, historical and intellectual conditions of the time. These concerns are formal and philosophical as well as practical. Class discussions include topics such as personalities, events, exhibitions, writings of critics and artists, values and studio practice. The seminars are required coursework from the sophomore through the senior years.

DRWG 205
Drawing I
3 credits
Drawing I focuses on multi-dimensional visualization and delineation as well as drawing as a process of perception and projection. Students are introduced to visual structures and concepts in their historical and contemporary contexts.

DRWG 206
Drawing II
3 credits
In Drawing II students continue to refine their skills in multi-dimensional visualization and delineation and in drawing as a process of perception and projection. The uses of digital as well as traditional drawing tools will be explored. Students continue to investigate visual structures and concepts in their historical and contemporary contexts.

DRWG 211
Life Study I
3 credits
In Life Study I, students study the human figure as expressing and reflecting concepts of nature. Approaches to the figure include formal structural analysis as well as the figure used as a medium itself, as an object of representation. And as the embodiment of human consciousness.

DRWG 212
Life Study II
3 credits
In Life Study II, students explore the human figure as expressing and reflecting concepts of nature. Approaches to the figure include formal structural analysis as well as the figure used as a medium itself, as an object of representation, and as the embodiment of human consciousness.

JWLR 205
Jewelry I
3 credits
This fundamental course is an introduction to basic direct metal fabrication techniques used to create small scale, wearable objects using non-ferrous metals. Design development is addressed as an extension of studio work with special attention paid to issues relation to scale and the body. NOTE: This course is a pre-requisite for all jewelry technical studios.

JWLR 206
Jewelry II
3 credits
This course builds upon the skills developed in Jewelry I. Students learn advanced direct metal fabrication techniques suitable for building small-scale, wearable objects with volume and depth. Precision and craftsmanship are emphasized as students integrate design concepts addressing scale and wearability with more complex techniques.

JWLR 221
Perspectives in Jewelry: CAD/CAM Technology
3 credits
This class integrates the development of technical skill in rapid prototyping technologies with the student's studio practice. Students will use CAD software at all steps of the design process, from sketch to final product. We will actively approach the use of CAD/CAM as a means to an end in relation to more traditional studio processes such as creating molds, jigs, dies, and other tools.

PTG 205
Painting I
3 credits
In Painting I, students will be introduced to a variety of formal approaches to building a painted surface. Investigations will include handling of paint materials, including their physical properties and attendant techniques. Assignments will explore color mixing, composition, edge, shape and form.

PTG 206
Painting II
3 credits
Painting II continues the previous semester's investigations of approaches to building a painted surface. Students refine their handling and knowledge of paint materials' physical properties and attendant techniques. Assignments explore color mixing, composition, edge, shape and form.

PRNT 203
Intaglio I
3 credits
Intaglio comes from the Italian word intaglio are "to incise." This course will instruct students in the techniques of intaglio printmaking on copper. Students will acquire basic in intaglio techniques through demonstration and practical application. Assignments and critiques will integrate formal qualities, concepts and technical exploration.

PRNT 211
Silkscreen I
3 credits
This course explores image making through the stencil (silk screen and related stencil techniques). Techniques include paper stencil, glue block out, lacquer block out, tussle and glue, cut film, and photo sensitive stencil-making. Students will investigate problems of imagery related to the medium as well as color mixing, registration, over printing, transparencies and edition printing. The course will feature critiques, demonstrations, and class discussions.

PRNT 212
Relief I
3 credits
Beginning with stamps and seals as signs of personal identity, relief is undoubtedly the oldest printmaking technique. This course will cover wood and linoleum block printing in black and white and reduction and multiple block printing in color. Students will learn these techniques through demonstration and practical application. Weekly assignments and critiques will integrate formal qualities, concepts and technical explorations.

SCU 205
Sculpture I
3 credits
This first course in the sculpture studio sequence emphasizes the development of formal perception and projection in three-dimensional space and introduces students to the basic concepts, materials, and processes of sculpture media. Processes of sculpture media.

SCU 206
Sculpture II
3 credits
This course builds on the topics on formal perception and projection from the previous semester and deepens students' understanding of key concepts, materials, and processes employed in sculptural practice.

TECH 223
Lost Wax Casting for Jewelry
3 credits
Students will learn all aspects of wax working and lost wax casting in a scale appropriate to jewelry. This process will enable students to create metal models and rubber molds for multiple component parts used in fabrication finished pieces of jewelry or small-scale objects.

TECH 507
Painting Processes
3 credits
Painting Processes offers a deep exploration of the technical and practical aspects of painting materials. Methods of instruction will include lectures, demonstrations, student research and class discussions. Most importantly, students will engage in 'hands on" interactions with the materials.

TECH 509
Ceramics
3 credits
This course explores ceramic processes through the development of form: coil, slab, pinch and wheel; and surface: slips, stains underglaze and glaze. Students will explore basic skill building in clay and develop their conceptual thinking in the medium through content driven class assignments and critiques.

TECH 519
Woodworking I
3 credits
This course introduces students to an array of woodworking and related fabrication techniques and processes. The use of hand, power and machine tools is taught through lectures, demonstrations and hands-on experience. Topics include basic woodworking techniques, safety procedures, wood identification, joinery, construction methods, shaping, turning, and finishing. Assigned and independent projects allow exploration while applying specific processes and techniques. Whether functional or sculptural, the goal of this course is to give students the knowledge to conceive and realize ideas in wood.

TECH 527
Casting and Moldmaking I
3 credits
This course will give students the knowledge and the tools to be able to replicate an object in one material in a different material such as plaster, plastic, cement, clay and other non-metallic materials. Students will be assigned exercises on basic mold-making principles, beginning with piece mold construction, continuing to applications and uses of various flexible molding techniques and ending with the waste mold technique.

Academics

PrattMWP boasts one of the greatest academic art programs and learning environments in the northeast.

Read More

Freshman Foundation

Drawing, 3-D Design, 4-D Design, Light/Color/Design, Liberal Arts

Students spend the first
two years of their Pratt art degree working closely with full-time faculty in a serious, focused art environment.

Fine Arts

Drawing, Jewelry, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture and Integrated Practices

PrattMWP students
show their work in our professional galleries to established, captive audiences.

Liberal Arts

Communications Design

Branding and Art Direction​, Graphic Design, Illustration

Prepare for a Bright Design Career at the Highly Ranked
Pratt Visual Communications Design Program.

Photography

If your goal is to earn a photography degree from a top New York photography school, PrattMWP is an outstanding option.

Art & Design Education

Art Teacher Certification Program

Pre-College Programs

Library

Academic Calendar

Student Life

The Student Life Office provides a safe and inclusive environment
to promote the holistic development of PrattMWP students,
not only as artists but as actively engaged and responsible community members.

Community Art

Beyond college education and studio time, PrattMWP students have even more opportunities to delve into their artistic passions through the Munson-Williams-Proctor
School of Art.

Special Programs

Request Information

Visiting Campus

More than 43 languages are spoken in the city of Utica.

Apply to PrattMWP

Applying to PrattMWP College of Art and Design